They Might be Giants: Women of Scandinavian Design

As an extension of last week's post, this week's post highlights the WOMEN that have impacted Scandinavian design and some their works. The line-up required a fair amount of digging, but I came back with some gems. These women are notable not only for their work as product designers, but also for their participation in the visual arts, packaging, and the literary scene during their time.  Make sure to click on the links to get more information about each of their trailblazing careers - 


GRETE JALK

Grete Jalk, Plywood GJ Chair  (1963) , is considered Jalk's best known work.  Still in production -  Get it HERE 

The late great Grete Jalk

The late great Grete Jalk

Double page spread in Mobilia


Hella Jongeirus book Misfit is the most comprehensive monograph of her work to date. Check out  an in depth look at the design and production of the book below. - a book worth HAVING

Hella Jongeirus book Misfit is the most comprehensive monograph of her work to date. Check out  an in depth look at the design and production of the book below. - a book worth HAVING

Dutch Industrial Designer Takeover Queen, Hella Jongerius - Inspiration for her Onyx Table in here series, Gemstone Tables.  See the full line HERE

Hella's process / research

Hella's process / research


MAJIA ISOLA

Maija_Isola.jpg
Maija Isola

NANNA DITZEL 

Nanna Ditzel : master cabinetmaker and historical trailblazer

Nanna Ditzel : master cabinetmaker and historical trailblazer

Back and Overview of Nanna Ditzel's 1989 Bench for Two.  


Karin Larsson's early 1900's rocking chair.  See images of the exhibition dedicated to her work at The Katrinetorps Farm in Malmo HERE

The Four Elements, by early 20th century Swedish designer Karin Larsson. 

The Four Elements, by early 20th century Swedish designer Karin Larsson. 

Jalk avidly contributed to literature on Danish furniture. From 1956-1962 she, along with Gunnar Bratvold, edited the seminal design furniture and interior design magazine Mobilia. Together, they edited four volumes.

Jalk avidly contributed to literature on Danish furniture. From 1956-1962 she, along with Gunnar Bratvold, edited the seminal design furniture and interior design magazine Mobilia. Together, they edited four volumes.


HELLA JONGERIUS

Hella Jongerius Quartz Table from the series, Gemstone Tables

Hella Jongerius: Misfit is a detailed survey of the work of Dutch product designer Hella Jongerius (b. 1963). She has collaborated with many prestigious manufacturers, including Vitra, Royal Tichelaar Makkum and Swarovski, and her work is held in the collections of MoMA, the Stedelijk Museum and the Design Museum in London, amongst many others.
Hella's Dragonfly table  

Hella's Dragonfly table  


 It was Maija Isola's bold designs that made Marimekko famous in the 1960s. She was influential in interpreting the events of the era and forecasting trends, and drew inspiration from traditional folk art, modern art, nature and her travels around the world. Her body of work, under Marimekko  includes more than 500 prints.


 It was Maija Isola's bold designs that made Marimekko famous in the 1960s. She was influential in interpreting the events of the era and forecasting trends, and drew inspiration from traditional folk art, modern art, nature and her travels around the world. Her body of work, under Marimekko  includes more than 500 prints.


 
Nanna Ditzel, Bench For Two (1989) Ditzel, otherwise known as the "First lady of Scandinavian Design", like other women in her generation, came up during time when the field was mostly male dominated.  Trained as a cabinetmaker at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, her work was multifaceted to include jewelry, ceramics and textiles. Read more of her story HERE

Nanna Ditzel, Bench For Two (1989)

Ditzel, otherwise known as the "First lady of Scandinavian Design", like other women in her generation, came up during time when the field was mostly male dominated.  Trained as a cabinetmaker at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, her work was multifaceted to include jewelry, ceramics and textiles. Read more of her story HERE


KARIN LARSSON

 Larsson, an avid textile and furniture designer was the wife and muse of the late, Carl Larsson.  The textile depicted here is attached to her original loom.  While raising her eight children, Larsson still designed all the furniture and textiles in her home. Above: Larsson at her loom

 Larsson, an avid textile and furniture designer was the wife and muse of the late, Carl Larsson.  The textile depicted here is attached to her original loom.  While raising her eight children, Larsson still designed all the furniture and textiles in her home. Above: Larsson at her loom

Karin Pictured here with her husband, Carl Larsson

Karin Pictured here with her husband, Carl Larsson